Cybersecurity Beginners Guide featured

Cybersecurity – A Beginner’s Guide

Cybersecurity is a term used to describe the practice of defending networks, devices, applications, and data from unauthorized access and cyber threats. It consists of a variety of different technologies, tools, processes, and approaches, for ensuring data integrity, confidentiality, and availability.

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BYOK – A Beginner’s Guide

Bring Your Own Key (BYOK), also referred to as Customer Supplied Encryption Keys (CSEK), is a model of encryption key management that enables customers to take full control of their encryption keys when storing data in the cloud. It allows them to use their own encryption key management software to store their encrypted keys outside of the cloud, instead of in the cloud, alongside their data.

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KMIP – A Beginner’s Guide

The Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) is a universal language for secure data management across platforms. It was developed by the Organization for Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS), with the purpose of enabling communication between key management systems and cryptographically-enabled applications.

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Cyber Resilience – A Beginner’s Guide

While cyber security is incredibly important, organizations are beginning to realize that they need to take their data protection strategies a step further. The term “cyber resilience” is becoming more prevalent, as a means of describing an organization’s ability to continue operating and to uphold the integrity of their data, even in the event of a breach.

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Encryption – A Beginner’s Guide

Encryption is the process of protecting data by changing it from a readable form to an unreadable form. It uses complex algorithms to “scramble” and therefore protect data – as it’s unreadable and can’t be accessed.

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Virtualized Storage – A Beginner’s Guide

Virtualized storage, or storage virtualization, is a technological concept developed within the past few decades. It enables organizations to remove the traditional boundaries of physical storage devices, by abstracting the disks and drives, and presenting them as a single, centralized pool of storage capacity.

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Virtual SAN – A Beginner’s Guide

A virtual storage area network (SAN) is a software-based component that provides a virtualized ‘pool’ of storage to multiple virtual machines (VMs) and applications. In order to achieve this, data is passed (shared) between servers over a network using a protocol such as iSCSI or fibre channel.

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High Availability – A Beginner’s Guide

High Availability (HA) describes a system that can sustain long periods of continuous operation, and remain operational, even if a part of the system is no longer in service. Decreased downtime, the elimination of single points of failure, and replication and distribution of data across multiple locations, are all contributing factors that come together to create a high availability infrastructure.

key management

Key Management – A Beginners Guide

Key management refers to the process of creating, using, storing, exchanging, archiving, discarding, and replacing cryptographic keys in an encryption system. Its purpose is to secure an organization’s keys, and to prevent cybercriminals or unauthorized individuals from accessing and corrupting sensitive data that has been protected through encryption.

hyperconvergence

Hyperconvergence – A Beginners Guide

Hyperconvergence is a term used to describe the consolidation of computing, networking, and storage resources, into a single, streamlined datacenter architecture. Traditional datacenter architecture requires specialist hardware, with each piece designated for a specific function, whereas hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) utilizes simplified hardware and software components.

edge computing

Edge Computing – A Beginners Guide

Edge computing is a term used to describe decentralized IT infrastructure. In an edge computing environment, applications, computation, and data storage are all carried out near the source of the data (i.e. at the “network edge”), as opposed to in the cloud or at an offsite datacenter. By processing data locally and minimizing the distance between devices and servers, edge computing delivers improved performance, requires less bandwidth, and reduces latency.

software defined storage

Software-Defined Storage – A Beginners Guide

Software-defined storage (SDS) is a form of storage virtualization. It significantly improves the simplicity and flexibility of data storage management by introducing a software layer, independent from the physical storage hardware (i.e. disks and SSDs). Subsequently, software-defined storage solutions allow more freedom in managing the way data is stored and retrieved.